Tag Archives: Joint Commission International

Three Things to Know about your Doctor

A recent Deloitte report on medical tourism predicted that outbound medical travel from the US could reach upwards of 1.6 million patients by 2012, with sustainable annual growth of 35 percent. If you are one of the many potential patients seeking high quality, affordable care outside of the US, you should know three things about your provider before boarding the plane: who they are, how and where they practice, and what are their results and outcomes.
The first question, who they are, probes the provider’s education, qualifications, experience and reputation. Most of this information is usually accessible on the doctor’s website and can be verified on accreditation organization websites or professional association resources. Check to see whether the practitioner is board certified by a reputable US or foreign specialty board and if they are a member of the national specialty society or association.

Secondly, ask how and where they practice. For example, plastic surgeons and dentists are likely to practice and operate in private clinics or ambulatory surgery facilities removed from a hospital setting. Some may even own the clinic and they should divulge that information to you. If something goes wrong during a procedure, make sure you understand how and where you would get emergency care, how you would be transported there, and who would pay for it. In addition, unlike more and more hospital facilities that are being accredited by the Joint Commission International, (click for a list of accredited hospitals) the organization responsible for making sure hospitals adhere to acceptable practices and procedures, independent, free-standing facilities frequently are not similarly examined or accredited.

Finally, and perhaps the most difficult information to find, is the outcome and results of a given procedure. Ask ” How many of these operations do you do in a week, a month or a year ?” Also, inquire about the number of cases that result in complications, the need for revision surgery or significant morbidity i.e. something that unexpectedly doesn’t work the way it should after surgery, or postoperative death. Most doctors, including those in the US, will be unable to give you an accurate answer because they don’t keep good records or have an unreliable system to keep track of results. Sometimes the best you can do is to talk to someone who has had a similar procedure.

Getting information about a doctor and his or her results in not easy, wherever they practice. The more information you know, however, the better you can determine whether surgery away from home makes sense.

The cool view to acquire home assignment over here allows students to buy essay online for their personal use.

Share Button

ObesityFree – Specializing in Laparoscopic Weight-Loss Surgeries

MedVoy is pleased to be partnered with ObesityFree that is focused on providing laparoscopic weight loss solutions for patients who have struggled for years with their excess weight. Obesity has become an epidemic and for the first time in many decades, life expectancy is expected to decline in years to come – by as much as 10 years because of this previously underestimated condition. A large number of weight loss operations have been devised over the last 50 years, including: vertical banded gastroplasty, gastric banding (adjustable or non-adjustable), Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy (Gastric Sleeve) and malabsorbtion procedures such as Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, biliopancreatic diversion and duodenal switch.

Dr. Rosales of ObesityFree has specialized in – Gastric Sleeve and Adjustable Gastric Band – because the best results have come from these procedures, while also being safer with less complications and side effects. Dr. Rosales received an Invasive Surgery Fellowship at the Christus Health Group in Monterrey, Mexico and has been specializing in these procedures for the past five years. The surgeries are performed at the JCI Accredited facility of the Christus Health Group in Monterrey, Mexico. Dr. Rosales is a member of the Member of the Mexican Association of Endoscopic Surgery, AMCE and is also a Board Certified Surgeon with the American College of Surgeons (ACS) Certified for Advanced Trauma and Life Support.

Please visit their page for more details.


Bright biographers stand by for professional right at already stated educational site https://writinghelponline.com/ that helps universal scholars.

Share Button

Vetting your Doctor

The term medical tourism is a bit of a misnomer as it downplays the serious nature of choosing a doctor – whether in your home country or abroad. The questions below, while not exhaustive, give you some guidance on choosing your doctor wisely.

What are your academic credentials?

Look for specialized training in the chosen field, such as plastic surgery / cosmetic surgery, bariatrics, orthopedics, fertility training, prosthodontics, etc. Many doctors have international training in the US and Europe and may be American-board certified which helps to put US patients at ease. High-quality doctors collaborate internationally and regionally so also, think twice before underestimating a surgeon if they have graduated from a reputable medical school overseas. If you’re not sure – ask MedVoy!

Are you accredited?

International accreditation for providers include: Joint Commission International JCI, Trent Accreditation Scheme (TAS) and International Organization for Standardization (ISO), while the International Board of Medicine and Surgery (IBMS) certifies physicians. Furthermore, many countries also have stringent national standards that follow international guidelines. One example is Colombia, where hospitals follow international non-profit ICONTEC standards that are identical to ISQua standards. Hence, all accredited hospitals in Colombia are subsequently accredited by ISQua. Malaysia also has the Malaysian Society for Quality in Health (MSQH) that acts as an independent, not-for-profit organization to ensure safety and quality.

How many of these surgeries have you performed?

Experience is one of the most important elements towards a successful outcome. Whether the doctor performs the surgery every day or a few times a year is significant! Do they specialize in a certain area? A cosmetic surgeon such as MedVoy’s partner Denver Cosmetic Surgery that specializes in the aging face is going to give you a better outcome than a dilettante. Find out how many of these surgeries the doctors has performed. Also, make sure that the actual surgeon will be performing the surgery and not a subordinate.

What materials do you use?

There is a wide range in quality in the materials used – so ask! Are they from a reputable company like Johnson and Johnson or Boston Scientific? Do they provide a guaranty? MedVoy’s partner Travel and Smile in Peru will uses German-made noble metal crowns and that are the standard in the US and Germany and gives a lifetime guarantee on quality. Make sure that you know this before you are actually there.

This list does not cover all the questions which is why it’s important to work with a well-established medical tourism company.

Check our mate organization http://domyhomework.guru for wired literacy.

Share Button

Is it safe?

In the 1976 thriller, “Marathon Man”, a sadistic ex-Nazi dentist(Laurence Olivier)  tortures an unknowing grad student ( Dustin Hoffman) to determine the whereabouts of stolen jewels, constanting asking “Is it safe?”.  The line was etched into the annals of celluloid history. It is now reappearing as more and more potential patients are asking whether it is safe to get care away from home.  A few things to remember:

1. Healthcare, whether delivered in the US or somewhere else, is never completely safe. The operating room, a hospital bed or even an outpatient clinic is potentially dangerous under the best of circumstances.

2. In general, the more times a surgeon and the facility where he or she works does a procedure, the better the outcome.

3. While education, credentials, experience and certification are important quality benchmarks, they sometimes do not tell the whole story.

4. Whether in the US or around the world, quality outcomes data are often incomplete or non-existent.

Patients choose doctors for many reasons. A rational decision based on quality data is rarely one of them.

Scholars catch the opportunity in order to http://www.pro-homework-help.com/ using networked cause.

Share Button

Center for Disease Control’s 2010 travel health guide includes medical tourism

The Center for Disease Control’s (CDC) 2010 travel health guide has a much-expanded section on medical tourism — the practice of going abroad for your medical care. U.S. citizens going overseas for medical or dental procedures often cite lower costs as their primary motivator.

The CDC updates its Health Information for International Travel (also called the “Yellow Book”) every two years. The latest edition discusses the pros and cons of medical tourism, and explains why the practice is on the rise.

“In recent years, standards have been rising in other parts of the world even faster than prices have surged in the U.S. Many physicians abroad trained in the U.S. and the Joint Commission International (JCI) applies strict standards to accreditation of offshore facilities. Those facilities use the same implants, supplies, and drugs as their U.S. counterparts. However, a heart bypass in Thailand costs $11,000 compared to as much as $130,000 in the U.S. Spinal fusion surgery in India at $5,500 compares to over $60,000 in the U.S.”

The CDC guide quotes the American Medical Associations tip for planning a surgery abroad:

–Patients should check to see if the medical facilities abroad have been accredited by recognized international accrediting bodies such as the Joint Commission International or the International Society for Quality in Health Care.

– Prior to travel, arrange local follow-up care to ensure continuity of care when you return from medical care outside the US

Particularly superb community http://www.essaysolution.net preeminent among international onlookers.

Share Button

AMA recently published its new guidelines on Medical Tourism. They are as below

(a) Medical care outside of the U.S. must be voluntary.
(b) Financial incentives to travel outside the U.S. for medical care should not inappropriately limit the diagnostic and therapeutic alternatives that are offered to patients, or restrict treatment or referral options.
(c) Patients should only be referred for medical care to institutions that have been accredited by recognized international accrediting bodies (e.g., the Joint Commission International or the International Society for Quality in Health Care).
(d) Prior to travel, local follow-up care should be coordinated and financing should be arranged to ensure continuity of care when patients return from medical care outside the US.
(e) Coverage for travel outside the U.S. for medical care must include the costs of necessary follow-up care upon return to the U.S.
(f) Patients should be informed of their rights and legal recourse prior to agreeing to travel outside the U.S. for medical care.
(g) Access to physician licensing and outcome data, as well as facility accreditation and outcomes data, should be arranged for patients seeking medical care outside the U.S.
(h) The transfer of patient medical records to and from facilities outside the U.S. should be consistent with HIPAA guidelines.
(i) Patients choosing to travel outside the U.S. for medical care should be provided with information about the potential

Work with that service find this in order to receive instructive cooperation from linked mentors.

Share Button